Posts Tagged ‘Matthew Wayne Selznick’

EP105: Impossible Dreams


2007 Hugo Nominee!

By Tim Pratt.
Read by Matthew Wayne Selznick (of Brave Men Run and Writers Talking).
First appeared in Asimov’s Science Fiction, July 2006.
All stories by Tim Pratt.
All stories read by Stephen Eley.

He went to the Sci-Fi shelf‚Äîand had another shock. I, Robot was there, but not the forgettable action movie with Will Smith‚Äîthis was older, and the credits said “written by Harlan Ellison.” But Ellison’s adaptation of the Isaac Asimov book had never been produced, though it had been published in book form. “Must be some bootleg student production,” he muttered, and he didn’t recognize the name of the production company. But‚Äîbut‚Äîit said “winner of the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay.” That had to be a student director’s little joke, straight-facedly absurd box copy, as if this were a film from some alternate reality. Worth watching, certainly, though again, he couldn’t imagine how he’d never heard of this. Maybe it had been done by someone local. He took it to the counter and offered his credit card.

She looked at the card dubiously. “Visa? Sorry, we only take Weber and FosterCard.”

Rated G. Contains excessive movie trivia; some of it true.

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Balticon 2007

EP092: The Boy Who Yelled “Dragon!”


By Mike Resnick.
Read by Matthew Wayne Selznick (of Brave Men Run and Five Minute Memoir).
Discuss on our forums.
First appeared in Young Warriors, ed. Tamora Pierce & Josepha Sherman.
All stories by Mike Resnick.
All stories read by Matthew Wayne Selznick.

Now, this Land was the home of exceptionally brave warriors
and beautiful damsels (and occasionally they were the same person,
since beautiful damsels were pretty assertive back then). Each
young boy and girl was taught all the arts of warfare, and were
soon adept with sword, mace, lance, bow and arrow, dagger, and the
off-putting snide remark. They were schooled in horsemanship,
camouflage, and military strategy. They learned eye-gouging, ear-biting, kidney-punching, and — since they were destined to become
knights and ladies — gentility.

So successful was their training that before long enemy
armies were afraid to attack them. Within the borders of the Land
justice was so swift that there was not a single criminal left. It
would have been a very peaceful and idyllic kingdom indeed —
except for the dragons.

Rated G. It’s a children’s story. Not recommended for cynical audiences.

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